About Florida Captioning Services

Florida Captioning Services (FCS) provides expert captioning services since 1989.

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Services Offered

FCS offers a full range of captioning services.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Have a Question?  Find the answer on our FAQ page.

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Contact Us for more information.

Telephone

407-450-0517

Email

captioningservices@cox.net

Frequently Asked Questions

What is closed captioning?
What are the benefits of closed captioning?
What are the current and future FCC broadcast caption requirements?
Why do captions sometimes appear garbled or have portions of words missing?
Is the Secondary Audio Programming (SAP) required to be captioned in that language?
Where do I get the most accurate, reliable, and economical real-time captioning?

Florida Captioning ServicesQ: What is closed captioning?
A: Closed captioning is an assistive technology designed to provide access to television for persons with hearing disabilities. Through captioning, the audio portion of programming is displayed as text superimposed over the video. In 1990, Congress first required television receivers to contain circuitry designed to decode and display closed captioning. As of July 1993, the Commission has required that all analog television sets with screens 13 inches or larger sold in the United States contain built-in decoder circuitry that allows viewers to display closed captions. Beginning July 1, 2002, the Commission also required that digital television (DTV) receivers include closed caption display capability.

As part of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, Congress instructed the Commission to require video program distributors (cable operators, broadcasters, satellite distributors and other multi-channel video programming distributors) to phase in closed captioning of their television programs. In 1997, the FCC implemented rules to provide a transition schedule for video program distributors to follow in providing more captioned programming. The rules require that distributors provide an increasing amount of captioned programming according to a set schedule.

Q: What are the benefits of closed captioning?
A: Closed captions provide a critical link to news, entertainment, and information for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing, enabling these individuals to be part of the cultural mainstream of our society. For individuals whose native language is not English, English language captions have also been used to improve comprehension and fluency in this language. In addition, studies have shown that captions have helped children learn to read and have improved literacy skills. In a professional or social setting, captioning allows people to still participate in broadcast programming with the audio portion of the program turned down. For broadcasters, captioning represents access to many new groups and audiences while providing a valuable public service. Viewers may select to watch closed captions through their remote controls or on-screen displays.

Q: What are the FCC broadcast caption requirements?
A: Requirements for new English language programming
As of January 1, 2006, and thereafter, 100% of the programming distributor's new nonexempt video programming must be provided with captions.

Requirements for pre-rule English language programming
As of January 1, 2008, and thereafter, 75% of the programming distributor's pre-rule nonexempt video programming being distributed and exhibited on each channel during each calendar quarter must be provided with closed captioning.

Requirements for new Spanish language programming
Between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2009, a video programming distributor shall provide at least an average of 1,350 hours of captioned Spanish language video programming or all of its new nonexempt Spanish language video programming must be provided with captions, whichever is less; and

As of January 1, 2010, and thereafter, 100% of the programming distributor's new nonexempt Spanish language video programming must be provided with captions.

Requirements for Spanish language pre-rule programming
After January 1, 2005, 30% of the programming distributor's pre-rule nonexempt Spanish language video programming being distributed and exhibited on each channel during each calendar quarter must be provided with closed captioning.

As of January 1, 2012, and thereafter, 75% of the programming distributor's pre-rule nonexempt Spanish language video programming being distributed and exhibited on each channel during each calendar quarter must be provided with closed captioning.

*There are exemptions to the rules (see Links page for FCC CC Rules)

Q: Why do captions sometimes appear garbled or have portions of words missing?
A: Interference in reception is usually the culprit. Captioning problems can stem from different sources, depending on the type of broadcast, such as network, syndication, or cable. The captions are delicate, and they travel from the caption company to the broadcaster through phone lines; then go through the encoding equipment; and then get bounced to the satellites, local stations, and cable companies. They finally pass through the home receiver and are displayed on your home television. There are many opportunities for them to encounter interference that affects their quality.

Q: Is the Secondary Audio Programming (SAP) required to be captioned in that language?
A: There are no FCC requirements mandating that SAP be captioned.

Q: Where do I get the most accurate, reliable and economical real-time captioning?
A: Florida Captioning Services!